What Constitutes Doing Business
ComplianceJune 05, 2020

What Constitutes Doing Business

When a corporation operates in any state other than its state of incorporation, it may be required to "qualify" or register to do business in that state. To qualify, the corporation must obtain a certificate of authority and appoint an in-state registered agent upon whom process may be served. The need to qualify is triggered if the corporation is considered to be doing business in the state. Although every state requires foreign corporations doing business in the state to qualify, no law contains a comprehensive definition of the term "doing business." And, the exact requirements vary from state to state. CT Corporation has prepared a comprehensive resource to help answer the question of what constitutes doing business within the meaning of qualification requirements.

What Constitutes Doing Business delineates what constitutes doing business by a corporation in states foreign to the state of its incorporation. It includes the articles, statutory provisions and cases dealing with the necessity of qualification by corporations doing business in foreign states. What Constitutes Doing Business also provides guidelines on what constitutes doing business in Canada, Guam, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.

Table of contents

  • Introduction
  • Chapter 1: Three Kinds of Doing Business
  • Chapter 2: Penalties for Failure to Qualify
  • Chapter 3: Statutory "Doing Business" Definitions Applicable to Ordinary Business Corporations
  • Chapter 4: Statutory "Doing Business" Provisions Limited to Lending Money on Security
  • Chapter 5: Specific Doing Business Activities
  • Chapter 6: Doing Business in Canada, Guam, Puerto Rico, US Virgin Islands
  • Chapter 7: Limited Liability Companies