HealthMarch 05, 2019

Checklist for creating a flipped classroom

For many nurse educators, the thought of teaching with the flipped classroom method may feel like standing on a high-dive, contemplating the long, scary jump into the water below. The good news is studies report that the flipped classroom method is an effective teaching strategy for nurse educators who want to bring active learning to the classroom.

By: Kimberly French, PhD, RN, Jefferson State Community College

For many nurse educators, the thought of teaching with the flipped classroom method may feel like standing on a high-dive, contemplating the long, scary jump into the water below. The good news is studies report that the flipped classroom method is an effective teaching strategy for nurse educators who want to bring active learning to the classroom. This method has been shown to increase both student engagement, critical thinking skills and test scores (Barbour & Schuessler, 2019; Ward, Knowlton, & Laney, 2018). Stepping out of one's comfort zone is, well, uncomfortable and full of uncertainty. Therefore, this checklist has been created to help nurse educators begin planning the implementation of the flipped classroom method.

The flipped classroom checklist incorporates the preliminary framework for implementing a flipped classroom presented by Barbour and Schuessler (2019), which includes planning pre-class activities, in-class activities and after-class activities. Using this checklist can help nurse educators structure students” learning environments and hopefully alleviate the angst and trepidation of transforming their classroom environments. Some examples of active learning strategies have been included in the checklist as well. More specific examples of active learning strategies can be found in the literature and in other blog posts.

The Flipped Classroom Checklist

1. Develop student learning outcomes (SLOs).

Student learning outcomes should be clear and measurable. Use these outcomes to assign appropriate teaching and learning strategies to each SLO.

2. Plan pre-class activities.

There are many pre-class activities nurse educators can assign to their students. The goal is for students to arrive to class with the knowledge required to successfully complete in-class activities. Therefore, appropriate pre-class activities include assigned readings, recorded lectures, and interactive guides for students to complete as they go.

3. Plan in-class activities.

There are vast amounts of in-class activities nurse educators can choose that allow students to apply their knowledge and actively learn. Educators should consider assigning value to pre-class work such as in-class quizzes for points, review content with a student response system using a team approach or have students present learned content.

Some educators may choose to have students work individually; however, assigning students to small groups (4-7 students in each group) can help them develop collaboration, teamwork and conflict resolution skills. Group activities that engage students include completing games and puzzles, retaking a quiz, creating a web quest, completing a gallery walk utilizing QR codes or sticky notes, working through case studies and/or virtual simulations, assigning group discussion stations and viewing videos.

Educators should consider using classroom assessment techniques such as a one-minute paper or a discussion board through a learning management system where students can identify confusing information or content needing clarification. Be sure to address these muddy points prior to the next class meeting or exam.

4. Plan after-class activities.

After-class activities are intended to collect feedback that addresses confusion and frustration. Address students” concerns through a short, recorded lecture; live discussion via social media; or a discussion board through a learning management system. Keep students actively learning through social media by sending an NCLEX® question of the day and encouraging students to make visual notes. Educators may also consider requiring students to use reflective journaling as an after-class activity.

Implementing the flipped classroom in small increments can help educators take on this new approach to nurse education. When I began using the flipped classroom method in a health assessment course, I transformed one module initially and gradually incorporated other modules in subsequent semesters. The flipped classroom method has not only allowed me to experience more engaged students, but the open discussion has helped me alleviate confusion and clarify information in real-time. If this seems overwhelming to new educators, the one-minute papers and discussion boards can help these educators prepare a clear response to students. The flipped classroom method may seem like a daunting endeavor, but educators may flip over how much they enjoy utilizing this engaging and effective teaching strategy.

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References

Barbour, C., & Schuessler, J. B. (2019). A preliminary framework to guide implementation of

The Flipped Classroom Method in nursing education. Nurse Education in Practice,

34, 36-42. doi: 10.1016/j.nepr.2018.11.001

Ward, M., Knowlton, M. C., & Laney, C. W. (2018). The flip side of traditional nursing education:

A literature review. Nurse Education in Practice, 29, 163-171.

doi: 0.1016/j.nepr.2018.01.003

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